Michael Asser

Psalter 2004

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Title: Psalter of the Prophet and King David • According to the Septuagint / With the Nine Odes and an explanation of how the Psalter should be read throughout the whole year / After the use of the Orthodox Church
Date: 2004
Publisher: Shrewsbury, Shrops. England (U.K.): [Greek Orthodox Community of the 318 Holy Fathers of Nicaea 1st Oecumenical Council]
Contents: Psalms 1–150 arranged into 20 kathismata. A Psalm not numbered [151]; Nine Odes. – Introduction (2 pp). – The order of Reading the Psalter.
Language:
References:
Images: (to follow)

Location: Collection Bibelarchiv–Birnbaum. Karlsruhe/ Baden. Germany
Comments: Print from pdf–file; 194 pp. Scripture text in single column, Chapters counted after the LXX; no versification. Psalm headings translated; no extras.
In his preface, Michael Asser writes:
»This English translation of the Psalter of the Orthodox Church from the Greek of the Septuagint is offered for the service of the Church by an English Orthodox layman. In the Church's services the Psalter is by far the most widely used Book of the Old Testament. This version of the Psalter is arranged in the twenty sections or kathismata, which are read through once a week in the services of Vespers and Matins. The verse division and layout follow that of the standard Psalter of the Greek Orthodox Church published by Apostoliki Diakonia of Athens: they differ in many minor respects from RahIfs‘ critical edition of the Septuagint. Proper names are given in their Greek form. (…) The following version seeks to be faithful both to the Septuagint and to English culture: to achieve this it takes the King James Bible as its base text and amends it only where it differs from the standard printed text of the Septuagint used in the Greek Orthodox Church.«

The Nine Odes translated are:
1.: An Ode of Moses in the Exodus. (Exodus 15: 1-19)
2.: An Ode of Moses in the Deuteronomy. (Deut. 32: 1-43)
3.: A prayer of Anna, the mother of Samuel the Prophet. (1 Kings 2: 1-10)
4.: A prayer of Avvacum the Prophet. (Avv. 3: 2-19)
5.: A prayer of Isaias the Prophet. (Is. 26: 9-20)
6.: A prayer of Jonas the prophet (Jon. 2: 3-10)
7.: A prayer of the holy three children. (Dan. 3: 26-56)
8.: The hymn of the holy three children. (Dan. 3: 57-88)
9/1: The song of the Theotokos. (Luke 1: 46-55) and
9/2:The prayer of Zacharias, the father of the Forerunner. (Luke 1: 68-79)

Psalter 2008 [revised & illustrated]

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Title: Psalter of the Prophet and King David • With the Nine Odes and an Explanation of How the Psalter Should Be Recited Trough out Orthodox Liturgical Year / Arranged and compiled from the / King James Version / Emended and versified according to / The Septuagint.
Arranged and compiled by Michael Asser • Edited by Saint Gregory Palamas Monastery / with Iconography. / Decorative Artwork by Saint Gregory Palamas Monastery
Date: 2008
Publisher: Etna CA (U.S.A.): Center for Traditionalist Orthodox Studies
Contents: Psalms 1–150 arranged into 20 kathismata. A Psalm by David´s own hand [151]; Nine Odes. – Introduction (2 pp). – The order for Reading the Kathismata of the Psalter plus 2 iconographs (8 pp)
Language:
References:
Images: (to follow)

Location: Collection Bibelarchiv–Birnbaum. Karlsruhe/ Baden. Germany

Comments: Paperbound octavo, adhesive binding, 288p illustrated. Scripture text in single column, Chapters counted after the LXX; verses numbered, Psalm headings translated; liturgical emendation.
The Nine Odes translated are:
1.: An Ode of Moses from the Book of Exodus. (Exodus 15: 1-19)
2.: An Ode of Moses from the Book of Deuteronomy. (Deut. 32: 1-43)
3.: A Prayer of Anna, the mother of Samuel the Prophet. (1 Kings 2: 1-10)
4.: A Prayer of Avvacum the Prophet. (Avv. 3: 2-19)
5.: A Prayer of Esaias the Prophet. (Is. 26: 9-20)
6.: A Prayer of Jonas the Prophet (Jon. 2: 3-10)
7.: A prayer of the Three Holy Youths. (Dan. 3: 26-56)
8.: The Hymn of the Three Holy Youths. (Dan. 3: 57-88)
9/1: The Ode of the Theotokos. (Luke 1: 46-55) and
9/2:The Prayer of Zacharias, the Father of the Forerunner. (Luke 1: 68-79)

Other than in the 2004 edition, there‘s no Preface nor introduction. On the “ctsonline“– website we read about this Psalter:
»Arranged for liturgical use, with full kathismata and verses. King James and Douai version English, translated to conform to the Septuagint. Full color, Icon plates, and manuscript ornamentation.«

Michael Asser revised the 2004 translation. The cover illustration bears the text of Psalm 118:164 (LXX): »Seven times a day I have praised thee«

LXX Old Testament – 2011

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Title: The Old Testament According to the Seventy • An English translation of the Greek Septuagint adapted from the King James Bible.
Date: 2011
Publisher: Colchester, Essex, England (U.K.): Orthodox England
Contents: Old Testament acc. to the LXX. Includes 3rd & 4th Maccabees, Epistel of Jeremia, 2 Esdras, Slavonic Appendix. – Preface (1 p), Introduction (2 pp).
Language:
References:
Images: (to follow)
Location: Collection Bibelarchiv–Birnbaum. Karlsruhe/ Baden. Germany

Comments: Print from pdf–file; 1279 pp in sum (=each Book numbered separately). Scripture text in running form, paragraph–wise. No extras.
Remark in the impressum:
»The English version of the Septuagint is based upon the text of the Authorized Version of the Bible (the King James Version) and the Apocrypha.«

In his preface, the Archpriest of St. John‘s Orthodox Church, Andrew Philipps, writes, dated 8/21 November 2011,

»I would like to emphasize that the present translation is a liturgical translation, in that it uses the received text of the Old Testament, as used by the Church of Greece. In other words, this translation is not designed for theoretical academic study, but for practical use in the Orthodox monastery and parish, as well as for prayerful private reading. This is why it uses liturgical language, with all its poetry, inspiration and constant call to prayer.«

In his Introduction, Michael Asser wrote, dated Shrewsbury, England, 2011,

»Despite its limitation, it is the Apostoliki Diakonia Greek text that has been taken as the starting point for this English version of the Septuagint, because it is an Orthodox text, and because it is readily accessible. The Prayer of Manasseh, which does not appear in primted Greek editions of the Septuagint, and the Slavonic books of Esdras in the order in which they appear in the Elizabeth Bible, have been included as an appendix.
In seeking to be faithful both to the Septuagint and to English culture, the Old Testament of the King James Bible has been taken as a base text and emended where it differs from the Septuagint. The aim has been as far as possible to make a translation such as King James’ translators might have made had they been working from the Greek Septuagint instead of the Masoretic Hebrew text. So the Ἀναγιγνωσκόμενα (“Worthy to be read”), which are known in the West as the Deuterocanonical Books or Apocrypha, are reproduced from the King James Version, with minor revisions to bring them closer to the printed Greek text. No attempt has been made to modernise the text of the King James Version in any significant way, except to remove unnecessary obstacles to understanding and to lighten the punctuation. The format of Apostoliki Diakonia’s edition has been followed for the order of books and verse, paragraph and chapter division.«

The translation of the Psalter here differs from the ones in the 2004 and 2008 editions. – The complete LXX Old Testament 'net translation can be read, downloaded and printed from http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/zot.htm


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